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Vorlesungsverzeichnis: SoSe 2019

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Englischsprachige Lehrveranstaltungen

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[Vl] IHL Clinic (International Humanitarian Law Clinic), in englischer Sprache, 2st.
vgl. Aushang
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
k.A.

Zielgruppe:
Jura, WV, ab 5.

[Vl] International and European Human Rights, 2st.
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
regelmäßiger Termin ab 17.04.2019
wöchentlich Mi. 12:00 - 14:00 Uhr,  Licher Str. 68, 44

Zielgruppe:
Jura, WV, ab 5.

Kommentar:

We start with a short discussion of the nature and function of human rights and an overview over the main historical landmarks in the history of human rights, including the drafting of the Universal Declaration and the development of the three major regional human systems in Latin America, Europe and Africa. We then focus our attention on key themes of human rights, ranging from civil and political to socio-economic and groups rights.
Suggested reading: Andrew Clapham, A Very Short Introduction to Human Rights, Oxford University Press 2015 (2nd. ed.)


[Vl] South African experiences around gender in the legal profession - legal aspects
Dozent/-in:
N.N.
Zeit und Ort:
k.A.

Kommentar:

This course examines the issue of gender in the legal profession, using the developing country of South Africa as a case study. As a starting point, the course looks at the historical background to the exclusion of women from the legal profession, and then provides an overview of the current constitutional and legislative framework regulating the legal profession in South Africa (against the background of relevant international human rights instruments). We will also look at the implementation of these measures in practice, with specific reference to aspects of gender in the judiciary.
While focusing on South Africa as an example, the course will address a number of issues that are of broader concern, including the phenomenon of gender stereotyping, the distinctions between formal and substantive equality, the meaning of "direct" and "indirect" discrimination and the as to whether a higher number of women in the legal profession (particularly the judiciary) should also imply a different approach to the adjudication of matters before the courts.
Requirement to obtain certificate: you will have to successfully complete a short essay on aspects of gender in the legal profession.

Allgemeine Informationen
Die Veranstaltung findet vom 07. - 09. August 2019, jeweils von 10 -12 Uhr und 13 - 15 Uhr, in HS 021 statt. Bei erfolgreicher Teilnahme, inklusive der Anfertigung eines kurzen Essays auf Englisch, kann ein Fremdsprachenschein im Sinne des § 9 Abs. 1 Nr. 2e JAG Hessen erworben werden.

Bei Interesse bitten wir um eine Anmeldung zu dieser Veranstaltung über Stud.IP bis zum 15. Juli 2019.


   
[Ü] Academic Writing
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
regelmäßiger Termin ab 16.04.2019
wöchentlich Di. 10:00 - 12:00 Uhr,  Alter Steinbacher Weg 44, Raum 303

Zielgruppe:
SoSc BA, WPV, oSem

Kommentar:

writing is about the form and method. Like all types of communicative exchanges, the knowledge created in an academic setting has to be presented in such a way, that the understanding of the contents is maximised. It also has to follow and reflect the tenets of the scientific method. This seminar will introduce the main points behind the conception, structure, and execution of an academic paper/thesis. We will talk about the importance of academic work, the generation of knowledge, how to write and what kind of language to use in a scientific context. The general goal is to generate an understanding about the importance of knowledge creation, the logic behind academic papers and provide the students with instruments to write successfully.
Examination method: Portfolio (English or German) and active participation during the seminar.


[Si] Anthropology of the Middle East & North Africa: Inquiries from the Margins
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
3 Einzeltermine:
So. 05.05.2019,10.00 - 15.00 Uhr   Phil II, E 112
Sa. 11.05.2019,10.00 - 15.00 Uhr   Phil II, E 112
So. 12.05.2019,10.00 - 15.00 Uhr   Phil II, E 112

Zielgruppen:
SoSc Ba, WPV, 4. Sem  |  SoSc Ba, WPV, 6. Sem  |  GuK Pol Ba, WPV, oSem  |  SLK Pol Ba, WPV, oSem  |  AB Ba, WPV, oSem  |  AB Ma, WPV, oSem  |  Ggr BSc, WPV, oSem  |  BWL Ba, PV/WPV, oSem  |  VWL Ba, PV/WPV, oSem  |  GuK Soz, WPV, oSem  |  SLK Soz, WPV, oSem  |  BFK Ba, WPV, oSem

[Si] Artificial Intelligence and Politics
Blockseminar
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
3 Einzeltermine:
Fr. 05.07.2019,12.00 - 18.00 Uhr   Phil. II E 207
Sa. 06.07.2019,09.00 - 18.00 Uhr   Phil. II E 201b
So. 07.07.2019,09.00 - 18.00 Uhr   Phil. II E 201b

Zielgruppen:
DuK Ma, WPV, 2. Sem  |  GuK Pol Ma, WPV, 2. Sem

Kommentar:

Short Description
There is an increasing focus on Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Business and Governments alike. Many countries across the globe have formulated strategies to benefit from the opportunities and mitigate the risks of this new technology. On the one hand, AI is perceived as a source of growth and social inclusion (A4Good), on the other critics fear surveillance, bias and technologial unemployment. We will seek to understand the current maturity of AI based on inputs of AI experts. In the seminar, we will analyse Government strategies, corresponding policies and their implications for politics.
The seminar will be held using design thinking approaches. The seminar is in english language.

Prereadings will be provided through StudIP

Logistics
July 5th 12 – 6 pm Room E 207
July 6th 9 – 6 pm Room E201b
July 7th 9 – 6 pm Room E201b


[Si] Assessing U.S. Foreign Policy under Trump: “The End of the World as We Know It”?
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
regelmäßiger Termin ab 16.04.2019
wöchentlich Di. 14:00 - 16:00 Uhr,  AstW303

Zielgruppen:
DuK Ma, WPV, 2. Sem  |  GuK Pol Ma, WPV, 2. Sem

Kommentar:

Since winning the elections in November 2016, President-elect and later President Donald J. Trump has shaken up long-established U.S. foreign policies in such diverse fields and areas as U.S.-China relations, North Korea, trade, or NATO and transatlantic relations. While we cannot proceed to a final assessment of an ongoing presidency, we already see that the Trump administration has induced uncertainty, for instance, as to the continuing commitment to collective defense in NATO, trade policies, and its engagement for a liberal world order. At the same time, changes in U.S. China, North Korea, and Russia policies remain vague at best. Combined with Trump’s specific political style, these developments cause severe stress to international diplomacy and cooperation that need further evaluation as to whether and how they influence/change U.S. foreign policy.
This seminar will dedicate itself to this evaluation in an exploratory manner. After some scheduled introductory sessions on the (past?) foundations of U.S. foreign policy and theoretical perspectives to assess it, the seminar will delve into the above (or other) areas based on joint discussion and student initiative. While the Trump presidency will be our empirical focus, we will also address the above issues comparatively by looking at other presidents/ periods.
At the end of the course, students will have acquired profound knowledge of past and current US foreign policy and contemporary challenges to international diplomacy and cooperation. By virtue of this, they will have expanded their knowledge of both foreign policy analysis and security institutions, too.
Instruction language will be English. Basic oral and academic command is sufficient and will be developed further through the proceedings of the course. Active engagement in designing and running the course is crucial for its success.
Examination requirements: brief oral impulse and research essay.


[Si] Climate Matters: Climate Change and Social Transformation
Die Veranstaltung beginnt in der zweiten Semesterwoche am 25.04.2019.
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
regelmäßiger Termin ab 25.04.2019
wöchentlich Do. 10:00 - 12:00 Uhr,  Phil II, E 104

Kommentar:

Climate change is not just one of the most urgent environmental challenges of our time. As anthropogenic climate change, it emerges from economic, political, and social conditions. And in its consequences it affects the social order, cultural self-understanding, and political and economic discourse. This class traces the social and cultural dimension of climate change.


[Si] Development & Growth
Course language: English
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
regelmäßiger Termin ab 17.04.2019
wöchentlich Mi. 12:00 - 14:00 Uhr,  Alter Steinbacher Weg 44, Raum 102

Zielgruppen:
SoSc Ba, WPV, oSem  |  GuK Soz, WPV, oSem  |  GuK Pol, WPV, oSem  |  SLK Soz, WPV, oSem  |  BWL Ba, PV/WPV, oSem  |  VWL Ba, PV/WPV, oSem  |  Ggr BSc, PV/WPV, oSem  |  AB Ba, WPF, oSem  |  AB Ma, WPV, oSem  |  BFK Ba, WPV, oSem  |  L2,L5:WF Sozk, WPV, oSem  |  L3:UF Sozk, WPV, oSem

Kommentar:

Since the end of World War II, there has been a consensus regarding the importance of development on a global scale, since dominant theories of development have determined the conception and implementation of policies and strategies allegedly designed for the not-developed countries to "catch up". But is development indeed the path to salvation, a solution to all ills of humanity? Or is development the cause of underdevelopment? This seminar offers an overview of the most relevant theories and concepts and aims to provide a deeper understanding of the impact that development has had on the Global South.
Examination method: Portfolio (English or German) + active participation during the seminar.


[Si] Feminist Theories of Social Inequality
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
regelmäßiger Termin ab 16.04.2019
wöchentlich Di. 16:00 - 18:00 Uhr,  Phil. II E 119

Zielgruppen:
SoSc Ba,WPV, 4./6. Sem  |  GuK Pol Ba, WPV, 4./6. Sem  |  SLK Pol Ba, WPV, 4./6. Sem  |  Ggr BSc, WPV, 4./6. Sem  |  VWL Ba, WPV, 4./6. Sem  |  BWL Ba, WPV, 4./6. Sem  |  B.Sc WiWi, WPV, 4./6. Sem  |  AB Ba, WPV, 4./6. Sem  |  L2,3,BBB,5, WPV, 4./6. Sem

[Si] Global Contemporary Populism
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
regelmäßiger Termin ab 16.04.2019
wöchentlich Di. 12:00 - 14:00 Uhr,  Alter Steinbacher Weg 44, Raum 303

Zielgruppen:
SoSc Ba, WPV, oSem  |  GuK Soz, WPV, oSem  |  SLK Soz, WPV, oSem  |  AB Ba, WPV, oSem  |  AB Ma, WPV, oSem  |  BWL Ba, PV/WPV, oSem  |  VWL Ba, PV/WPV, oSem  |  Ggr BSc, WPV, oSem  |  GuK Pol, Ba, oSem  |  SLK Pol Ba, WPV, oSem  |  BFK Ba, WPV, oSem  |  L 2,3,5, WPV, oSem

Kommentar:

Traditionally, populism was seen as a characteristic of the Global South politics. The spread of populism worldwide has become an issue of increasing concern both for academia and global citizenship. From the U.S. to Venezuela, to Germany, right and left-wing parties are increasingly adopting populism as a rhetorical strategy and a political logic. In the course of this seminar, we will explore the concept of populism using current and past examples from around the world.
Examination method: One presentation + One Academic Paper/ Hausarbeit (English or German) and active participation during the seminar.


[Si] Global Governance and the Transformation of Economic and Social Systems towards Sustainability
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
regelmäßiger Termin ab 16.04.2019
wöchentlich Di. 10:00 - 12:00 Uhr,  Phil. II E 207

Zielgruppen:
DuK Ma, WPV, 2. Sem  |  GuK Pol Ma, WPV, 2. Sem  |  MSc GC, WPV, 2. Sem

Kommentar:

The Goals for Sustainable Development (SDGs) include targets for global environmental and social politics that require fundamental transformations in nearly all important economic and social spheres by 2030. Some of these goals are so ambitious that they will hardly be achieved if global policymaking relies on the normal approach of "muddling through". On the one hand, the seminar will assess why past policy changes were not as far-reaching as required. It is obvious that achievements in important policy areas such as climate change, protection of tropical forests, sustainable agriculture (to mention only a few of these critical issues) were by far less-far reaching as necessary. In addition, the framework conditions for the development of effective global policies deteriorated in light of new nationalism, retreat from mutlilateralism by single states or denial of the relevance of environmental and social issues by populists. The seminar will also explore the impacts of these developments on global environmental and social governance (e.g., on single regimes or international organizations). It will focus on developments at global, regional, national and sub-national levels and also consider the important role of business and NGOs. Students will be given the opportunity to suggest their own topics for seminar sessions at the beginning of the seminar


[Si] Global Justice
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
regelmäßiger Termin ab 15.04.2019
wöchentlich Mo. 14:00 - 16:00 Uhr,  Phil. II E 106

Zielgruppen:
DuK Ma, WPV, 2. Sem  |  GuK Pol Ma, WPV, 2. Sem  |  ATW Ma, WPV, alle Sem

Kommentar:

Global Justice is an issue in historical terms (colonialism, imperialism, ‘East-/West-divide’, ‘North-/South-divide’) as well as in contemporary and future terms (war and violence, migration, global poverty, resources, climate etc.). Political and philosophical discourses center on the question, whether and – as the case may be – how a normative and institutional order beyond the nation state can be envisioned, and whether cosmopolitan principles can be justified and applied (and, respectively, to whom). The challenge to justify cosmopolitan politics and policies seems to be much harder to fulfil than Nation-state related principles like democracy, rule of law, constitutionality, checks-and-balances etc. Lacking direct chains of democratic legitimacy, global order and global norms highly rely on (‘universal’) principles of justice. However, those are – at the same time – highly contested. Beyond that background, we will, firstly, discuss different concepts of global justice (traditional notions like the sovereignty of states and more cosmopolitan notions like humanitarian duties, solidarity and the like) and their origin in the history of ideas; we will, secondly, discuss and analyze the different notions of responsibility (global vs. local, contractual responsibility, dis-/re-distributional responsibility, and criminal reliability amongst others), and, thirdly, regard current conflicts and disputes.
Recommended books: Pogge, Thomas (2008): Global Justice: Seminal Essays: Global Responsibilities, Paragon Issues in Philosophy; Pogge, Thomas (2008): Global Ethics: Seminal Essays, Paragon Issues in Philosophy; Brooks, Thom (2009): The Global Justice Reader, Wiley.


[Si] Human rights in global perspective
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
regelmäßiger Termin ab 30.04.2019
wöchentlich Di. 08:00 - 10:00 Uhr,  Phil. II E 104
2 Einzeltermine:
Sa. 11.05.2019,10.00 - 16.00 Uhr   Phil. II E 101
Sa. 08.06.2019,10.00 - 16.00 Uhr   Phil. II E 101

Zielgruppen:
DuK Ma, WPV, 2. Sem  |  GuK Pol Ma, WPV, 2. Sem

[Si] Human Rights Protection and War: From the “Humanitarian Intervention” via the Responsibility to Protect – back towards Hegemonic Orders?
Ab Mi., 17.4., wöchentlich 12-14h
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
regelmäßiger Termin ab 17.04.2019
wöchentlich Mi. 12:00 - 14:00 Uhr,  AstW101

Zielgruppen:
DuK Ma, WPV, 2. Sem  |  GuK Pol Ma, WPV, 2. Sem

Kommentar:

Fifteen years after its endorsement by the U.N. world summit (2005), the status, meaning and applicability of the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) as either just political rhetoric, or a tool/instrument of the powerful states, or a cosmopolitan project, or a securitization act in the name of a “war on terrorism”, or an emerging legal norm remain disputed and a controversy.

Unsurprisingly, NATO’s failed intervention in Libya 2011 reinforced the view of critics who continue to see the R2P as an encroachment on the sovereignty of weak states and as a hegemonic, or imperial, project of the West in the name of a “liberal interventionism” and a “New World Order”. And Western non-intervention in Syria raises the discussion whether the R2P is dead, or has at least failed. At the same time, however, there is an observable – and recurrent – tendency among some non-Western (most of them also non-democratic, rather authoritarian) powers to legitimize their military interventions abroad in ‘humanitarian’ terms, claiming for saving national/ethnical minorities, or religious fellows. Russia’s interventions in Georgia 2008 and in the Crimea 2014, where humanitarian reasoning has been coupled with the politics of irredentism, are cases in point. Other examples of a seemingly new (but in fact just recurrent) authoritarian interventionism are Turkey’s intervention in Syria, or Saudi Arabia’s and Iran’s intervention in Yemen.

The seminar sheds light on such instances of Western and non-Western military ‘humanitarian interventions’ from different theoretical perspectives in IR by asking a number of empirical, conceptional and theoretical questions:
(1) Are references to humanitarian principles simply meant to disguise geopolitical and hegemonic motives in the above-mentioned cases? Or is there an element of cosmopolitan norm evolution without falling into the trap of “civilizing the uncivilized”, and justifying colonialism? Or is there norm diffusion, or (unintended) non-linear norm evolution at work, meaning that authoritarian states can also be norm entrepreneurs?

(2) Do military efforts to “save strangers” and to “save our people” question the cosmopolitan foundation of humanitarian ideas? Or do humanitarian norms quite contrary have constitutive effects on a global scale?

(3) Is it still adequate, or has it ever been adequate, to understand the R2P debate in terms of a divide between democratic and non-democratic or Western versus non-Western states based of an understanding of positive, linear norm evolution since the early 1990s? Is there still a nexus of Western liberal democracy, norms and norm entrepreneuership, as liberal and constructivist approaches in IR presume, or suggest, or wholeheartedly defend? Or is it more adequate to rethink “humanitarian interventions” under the R2P umbrella through realist lens as a hegemonic/imperial project of the powerful by looking back to the interventions of the great powers in the 15th to 19th century and during the Cold War in the name of “protecting Christians and Jews”, ”promoting democracy and regime change” or “fighting back communism”?

The seminar encourages students of International Relations thinking and arguing within and between different theoretical traditions to discuss all these and other fundamental questions and, thus, to rethink the R2P in light of contemporary politics, or practices, of human rights protection by democratic and authoritarian states. The above-mentioned examples also require us to rethink the validity and conceptional boundaries of theories of norm entrepreneurship, diffusion and contestation. They also might lead to new analytical efforts to operationalize the concept of norm abuse (and, thus, to establish it as a scientific rather than just a political term).


COURSE AIMS:

• Reconstructing the history of the R2P from the Christian Just War tradition via the 19th century concept of the „Humanitarian Intervention“ to contemporary and new understanding of sovereignty as responsibility to protect in international law.

• Elaborating the conflict, or tension (Spannungsverhältnis) between two norms in inter-national law: Westphalian state sovereignty (including the principles of non-interventionism and non-use of violence) and human rights protection (including a erga omnes-norm of interventionism and the use of force in the name of human rights protection).

• Discussing whether the R2P is political rhetoric, or a tool of the powerful, or a cosmopolitan project, or a securitization act, or an emerging legal norm?

• Discussing the achievements and the dark sides of the R2P: Is the R2P a tool of the powerful? And a Western “liberal” project of hegemony, or imperialism?

• Discussing a seemingly new but in fact old trend: Authoritarian Interventionism, and its roots in the 19th and 20th Century European Concert of Power and Cold War history.


LITERATURE:

Bellamy, Alex/Luck, Edward C. 2018: The Responsibility to Protect, from Promise to Prac-tice. Newark : Polity Press.

Bellamy, Alex 2011: The Responsibility to Protect and International Law. Leiden: Nijhoff.

Bellamy, Alex 2009: R2P: The global effort to end mass atrocities. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Boutros-Ghali, Boutros 1992: An agenda for peace: preventive diplomacy, peace-making and Peacekeeping, UN Document.

Brock, Lothar/Holm, Hans-Hendrik/Soerensen, Georg/Stohl, Michael 2011: Fragile States. Violence and the Failure of Intervention. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Cunliffe, Philip (ed.) 2011: Critical Perspectives on the Responsibility to Protect. Interrogat-ing Theory and Practice. London: Routledge.

Deng, Francis 1996: Sovereignty as Responsibility: Conflict Management in Africa. Wash-ington D.C.: Brookings Institution.

Finnemore, Martha 2003: The Purpose of Intervention: Changing Beliefs about the Use of Force. Ithaca/London: Cornell University Press.

Fukuyama, Francis1992: The end of history and the last man. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

(forthcoming) Hansel, Mischa/Reichwein, Alex (eds.), Rethinking the Responsibility to Protect: Challenged or Confirmed? Heidelberg: Springer (Reihe: Norm Research in International Relations, ed. by Antje Wiener).

(forthcoming) Hansel, M./Reichwein, A., A dangerous responsibility: Back towards a new Authoritarian Interventionism?, in: Hansel, M./Reichwein, A. (eds.), Rethinking the Responsibility to Protect.

(im Erscheinen) Hansel, M./Reichwein, A. (Hrsg.), Die Internationale Schutzverantwortung: Etabliert. Herausgefordert. Gescheitert? Berlin/Münster/Wien/Zürich/London: LIT Verlag (begutachtete Reihe Studies on Effective Multilateralism for Sustainable Development, hrsg. v. Prof. Fischer).

(i. E.) Hansel, M./Reichwein, A., A dangerous responsibility: Auf dem Weg zurück zu einem neuen Autoritären Interventionismus?, in: Hansel, M./Reichwein, A. (Hrsg.), Die Internationale Schutzverantwortung.

Hehir, Aidan 2019: Hollow Norms and the Responsibility to Protect. Cham: Palgrave Macmil-lan/Springer International Publishing.

Hehir, Adrian/Murray, Robert W. (eds.) 2013: Libya, the Responsibility to Protect and the Future of Humanitarian Intervention. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Heraclides, Alexis/Dialla, Ada 2015: Humanitarian Intervention in the Long Nineteenth Cen-tury. Setting the Precedent. Manchester: University Press.

Hilpold, Peter 2015: The Responsibility to Protect (R2P): A New Paradigm of International Law? Leiden: BRILL.

Kaldor, Mary 1999: New and Old Wars. Organized Violence in a Global Era. Oxford: Uni-versity Press.

Lyons, Gene M./Mastanduno, Michael (eds.) 1995: Beyond Westphalia: State Sovereignty and International Intervention. Baltimore/London: Johns Hopkins University Press.

Pattison, James 2010: Humanitarian Intervention and the R2P: Who Should Intervene? Ox-ford: University Press.

Peters, Daniel/Krause, Dan (eds.) 2017: Southern democracies and the responsibility to pro-tect. Baden-Baden: Nomos.

Reinhold, Theresa 2014: Sovereignty and R2P: the power of norms and the norms of the powerful. London: Routledge.

Simms, Brendan/Trim, D.J.B. (eds.) 2011: Humanitarian Intervention: A History, Cambridge/UK: University Press.

Simpson, Garry 2004: Great Powers and Outlaw States. Unequal Sovereigns in the International Legal Order. Cambridge/UK: University Press.

Tesón, Fernando R. 2005: Humanitarian intervention: an inquiry into law and morality. Ardsley, NY : Transnational Publishers.

Thakur, Ramesh 2006: The United Nations, Peace and Security: From Collective Security to the Responsibility to Protect. Cambridge: University Press.

Wheeler, Nicholas 2000: Saving Strangers. Humanitarian Intervention in International Socie-ty. Oxford: University Press.

Wyatt, Samuel James 2019: The Responsibility to Protect and a Cosmopolitan Approach to Human Protection. Cham: Palgrave Macmillan/Springer International Publishing.

At the beginning of the seminar, a Syllabus (incl. mandatory reading) will be published.


STUDENT REQUIREMENTS:

(1) Participation in the seminar;
(2) Reading and discussing mandatory readings;
(3) Presentation of a text/issue/theme during the seminar; I provide you with more information in the class by means of a guidline;
(4) Thesis, deadline for submitting: 30. September 2019; I provide you with more information in the class by means of a guideline.


[Si] Justice and Democracy (Block)
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
6 Einzeltermine:
Fr. 10.05.2019,12.00 - 14.00 Uhr   Phil. II E 201
Fr. 10.05.2019,14.00 - 16.00 Uhr   Phil. II E 112
Fr. 10.05.2019,16.00 - 18.00 Uhr   Phil. II E 101
Sa. 11.05.2019,10.00 - 18.00 Uhr   Phil. II E 104
Fr. 05.07.2019,14.00 - 16.00 Uhr   Phil. II E 104
Sa. 06.07.2019,09.00 - 12.00 Uhr   Phil. II E 106

Zielgruppen:
DuK Ma, WPV, 2. Sem  |  GuK Pol Ma, WPV, 2. Sem

[Si] New typologies of labor: precarious labor,bullshit jobs, unpaid - forced word and forms of resistance
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
regelmäßiger Termin ab 18.04.2019
wöchentlich Do. 16:00 - 18:00 Uhr,  Phil II, E 02

Zielgruppen:
SoSc Ba, WPV, 4. Sem  |  SoSc Ba, WPV, 6. Sem  |  GuK Pol Ba, WPV, oSem  |  SLK Pol Ba, WPV, oSem  |  AB Ba, WPV, oSem  |  AB Ma, WPV, oSem  |  Ggr BSc, WPV, oSem  |  BWL Ba, PV/WPV, oSem  |  VWL Ba, PV/WPV, oSem  |  GuK Soz, WPV, oSem  |  SLK Soz, WPV, oSem  |  BFK Ba, WPV, oSem

Kommentar:

How to think about novel forms of labor in postindustrial societies? What are the political implications of (un)organized labor in the globalized economy? This course aims to explore the role of new and historical forms of labor, be it precarious labor, reproductive work, so called bullshit jobs, as well as heavily gendered, classed and racialized positions of job seeking subjects. We will be looking at a range of historical and contemporary phenomena that have consequences for laboring men and women worldwide and try to foster a discussion on the role of labor in contemporary societies. The course also aims to point to oppressive regimes of exploitation lingering under the equation of liberty with the markets under neoliberalism.


[P Si] Political and Pop Culture in the U.S.
Course language: English
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
regelmäßiger Termin ab 18.04.2019
wöchentlich Do. 10:00 - 12:00 Uhr,  Alter Steinbacher Weg 44, Raum 303

Zielgruppen:
SoSc Ba, WPV, oSem  |  GuK Soz, WPV, oSem  |  SLK Soz, WPV, oSem  |  AB Ba, WPV, oSem  |  BWL Ba, PV/WPV, oSem  |  VWL Ba, WPV, oSem  |  Ggr BSc, PV/WPV, oSem  |  BFK Ba, WPV, oSem  |  L2,3,5, WPV, oSem

Kommentar:

The way we perceive and experience politics is changing, and Donald J. Trump is evidence of it. It is accurate to say that, at least on a perceptive level, the position of President of the United States of America carries a lot of weight on the international arena. Thanks to Hollywood and the Internet the aura that surrounds the position is larger than life, and we’ve learned to see the U.S President as an unbreakable and incorruptible force of nature that will fight against terrorists and even aliens to save the “free world” from a wretched fate. Now a lot has changed, and while the title of “leader of the free world” has shifted to Angela Merkel, the U.S and the world concentrates on the daily discussion of what did he do (or didn’t do), which resembles the coverage of TMZ and the dynamics of reality television.
Consequently, the divide between pop culture for the masses and political culture for the people is disappearing as the differentiation between serious news coverage and celebrity gossip dissolve. The political culture of the country is experiencing a shift which opens new and fascinating opportunities to explore a lot of questions. This seminar examines the shift from political culture to all-embracing pop culture, using the current administration of Donald J. Trump as the primary example.
Examination method: One presentation + One Academic Paper/ Hausarbeit (English or German) and active participation during the seminar.


[Si] Politics and Conflicts in the Middle East
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
regelmäßiger Termin ab 26.04.2019
wöchentlich Fr. 10:00 - 12:00 Uhr,  Phil. II E 104

Zielgruppen:
SoSc Ba,WPV, 4./6. Sem  |  GuK Pol Ba, WPV, 4./6. Sem  |  SLK Pol Ba, WPV, 4./6. Sem  |  Ggr BSc, WPV, 4./6. Sem  |  VWL Ba, WPV, 4./6. Sem  |  BWL Ba, WPV, 4./6. Sem  |  B.Sc WiWi, WPV, 4./6. Sem  |  AB Ba, WPV, 4./6. Sem  |  L2,3,BBB,5, WPV, 4./6. Sem

[P Si] Post-colonialism and Knowledge in a Globalized World
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
regelmäßiger Termin ab 18.04.2019
wöchentlich Do. 12:00 - 14:00 Uhr,  Alter Steinbacher Weg 44, Raum 303

Zielgruppen:
SoSc Ba, WPV, GS  |  AB Ba, WPV, GS  |  BFK Ba, WPV, oSem  |  L2,L5: WPV, oSem  |  L3, UF Sozk, WPV, oSem  |  VWL Ba, WPV, oSem  |  BWL Ba, WPV, oSem  |  Ggr BSc, WPV, oSem  |  GuK Ba, WPV, oSem  |  AB Ma, WPV, oSem

Kommentar:

The global interdependency we live in has consequences on all levels of human endeavour, including the production of knowledge. Hence, the universalisation of “dominant” Western worldviews is an expected outcome of the process of globalisation. This seminar will examine the effects of globalisation on the production and management of knowledge.
Examination method: Portfolio (English or German) and active participation during the seminar.


[Si] Reading Seminar on Jacques Derrida: "Understanding Difference in Contemporary Societies
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
regelmäßiger Termin ab 16.04.2019
wöchentlich Di. 12:00 - 14:00 Uhr,  Phil II, E 02

Zielgruppe:
GKM Ma, WPV,oSem

Kommentar:

Derrida is an important author in contemporary social theory, influencing theoretical approaches such as postcolonialism, decolonial though, and theories of cultural and social difference. Yet, his writing is perceived as complex and thus often ignored. In this reading seminar we will collectively analyze some of Derrida's main texts, and discuss how his radical philosophical approach helps us to better understand the concept of difference in contemporary societies. Furthermore, students will hold presentations on secondary literature on Derrida to increase the comprehension of his theory.
Evaluation: Paper (In English, German or Spanish) and text presentation (English or German)


[Si] Social Movements and the Political
Course language: English
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
regelmäßiger Termin ab 18.04.2019
wöchentlich Do. 16:00 - 18:00 Uhr,  Alter Steinbacher Weg 44, Raum 102

Zielgruppen:
SoSc Ba, WPV, oSem  |  GuK Soz, WPV, oSem  |  GuK Pol, WPV, oSem  |  SLK Soz, WPV, oSem  |  BWL Ba, PV/WPV, oSem  |  VWL Ba, PV/WPV, oSem  |  Ggr BSc, PV/WPV, oSem  |  AB Ba, WPF, oSem  |  AB Ma, WPV, oSem  |  BFK Ba, WPV, oSem  |  L2,L5:WF Sozk, WPV, oSem  |  L3:UF Sozk, WPV, oSem

Kommentar:

The protests which took place in US, Europe and Middle East, i.e. Occupy, Indignados, the Arab Spring, in the last decade have been already largely discussed in the social movements’ literature. Despite the local and national dynamics which make each of these examples of collective action unique, the similar grievances through which they stem from and the commonalities regarding the content and process of their emergence have been emphasized as aspects that make these movements parts of a global wave of protest movement. Neoliberal policies and authoritarian politics alongside commodification and social inequality have been the common issues of the roots of these movements. Moreover, the occupation of public spaces, extensive use of online platforms as well as creative and performative ways of protesting have been scrutinized as dimensions demonstrating the analogous character of these movements. Given their common characteristics, these experiences of collective action have also been the spaces and temporalities through which the notion of the political has been discussed and reflected upon, therefore redefined and practiced in new ways, particularly within the new participatory public spheres emerged in the occupied public places.

Grounded upon readings on the recent wave of global protests as well as on the notion of the political, this course will focus on the discussions on the changing/transforming notion of the political/politics in the course of the recent wave of global protest movements. Employing a cultural perspective in studying social movements, individual’s experiences, particularly their morals and emotions in addition to their thoughts, will be highlighted regarding the participants’ ways of relating to the political in the context of the protests.

The students will be expected to attend the class and read assigned materials. In addition, the students will submit a half-page response paper prior to each class, by which they will reflect on the readings by providing their positive as well as critical comments in a well-thought and well-written form. At the end of the course, the students will submit a final paper in which they ground their individual research questions and topics upon the readings and the discussions held throughout the course.


[Si] Structural and everyday violence
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
regelmäßiger Termin ab 18.04.2019
wöchentlich Do. 16:00 - 18:00 Uhr,  Alter Steinbacher Weg 44, Raum 101

Zielgruppen:
SoSc Ba, WPV, 4. Sem  |  SoSc Ba, WPV, 6. Sem  |  GuK Pol Ba, WPV, oSem  |  SLK Pol Ba, WPV, oSem  |  AB Ba, WPV, oSem  |  AB Ma, WPV, oSem  |  Ggr BSc, WPV, oSem  |  BWL Ba, PV/WPV, oSem  |  VWL Ba, PV/WPV, oSem  |  GuK Soz, WPV, oSem  |  SLK Soz, WPV, oSem  |  BFK Ba, WPV, oSem

[Si] The Politics of Development
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
Vorbesprechung: Do. 18.04.2019, 10.00 - 12.00 Uhr, Phil. II E 101
regelmäßiger Termin ab 29.04.2019
wöchentlich Mo. 10:00 - 12:00 Uhr,  Phil. II E 101
2 Einzeltermine:
Do. 18.04.2019,10.00 - 12.00 Uhr   (Vorbesprechung) Phil. II E 101
Sa. 27.04.2019,10.00 - 16.00 Uhr   Phil. II E 104

Zielgruppen:
DuK Ma, WPV, 2. Sem  |  GuK Pol Ma, WPV, 2. Sem

[Si] Childhood in the Countries of the Global South  (AEW 2 B)
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
regelmäßiger Termin ab 17.04.2019
wöchentlich Mi. 10:00 - 12:00 Uhr,  Phil. II, B 018

Zielgruppen:
BFK Ba, WPV, 4. Sem  |  AB Ba, WPV, 4. Semester

Kommentar:

This seminar addresses the socio-economic, cultural, and global context of child development, child rearing practices that shape childhood experiences. It reviews existing theories, perspectives, and practices of child development, child rights, child poverty, child vulnerability and child labor. It specifically focuses on the role of local and global policies and in improving the situation of vulnerable and at-risk children in the global south.


[Si] Education in the Global South  (MA EZW AEW HETER)
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
regelmäßiger Termin ab 26.04.2019
wöchentlich Fr. 12:00 - 14:00 Uhr,  Phil. II, B 209

Zielgruppe:
AB Ma, PV/WPV, o.Sem

Kommentar:

This Seminar explores the histories and philosophies of indigenous education in the global south and western/European models of education that is adopted in Africa, Asia and Latin America. It closely examines the situation in sub-Saharan Africa in terms of the impact of Western/International partners and supranational actors in shaping education policies and practices in the developing world including the aims and purposes of education, curriculum, learning assessment and language of instruction. Furthermore, it discusses the models and practices of multicultural education and multicultural curriculum in ethnically diverse societies.


[Si] Educational Organization and Leadership (Bachelor) (Bildungsorganisation und Führung)  (C)
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
regelmäßiger Termin ab 26.04.2019
wöchentlich Fr. 14:00 - 16:00 Uhr,  Phil II, B 209

Kommentar:

This seminar, apart from distinguishing educational organization from non-educational organizations, covers the basic concepts and principles management and leadership, discusses classical and modern leadership theories as applied to educational organizations; school organizational climate, organizational culture and structure, and their implications to school effectiveness.


 
[Ü] Cold War Cultures: Local, National, Transnational
Unterrichtssprache ist englisch.
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
regelmäßiger Termin ab 16.04.2019
wöchentlich Di. 14:00 - 16:00 Uhr,  Phil. I, D 209

Kommentar:

The course explores different theoretical and methodological approaches to studying the Cold War. With a focus on Central, Eastern and South Eastern Europe, the course will involve wider implications relevant for European and global history. Taking the dynamic period of the Cold War as a case study, students will actively engage with the question of scale in history: from microhistory, across national and regional levels, to international, transnational, transregional, and global histories. The class dynamics will be based on the combination of theoretical and conceptual contributions with concrete case studies that illustrate them. The course draws on contributions from political, economic, social and cultural history.
Following the paradigm of the transcultural turn in history writing and humanities, particular attention will be dedicated to larger frameworks of analysis, discussing global history, transnational networks, entangled histories, and transfers of ideas. In this way, students will be familiarized with the Cold War history beyond the binary narrative of superpower rivalries by exploring the histories of socialist globalization, international networks and alliances, global labour history and struggles of small states for their position in the global political order.

Key readings:
Aslanian, Sebouh David, Joyce E. Chaplin, Ann McGrath, and Kristin Mann. ‘AHR Conversation. How Size Matters: The Question of Scale in History’, The American Historical Review 118, (2013), 1431-1472.

Bayly, C. A. et al, ‘AHR Conversation: On Transnational History’, American Historical Review, 111, (2006), 1440–1464.

Cohen, Deborah and Maura O’Connor, ‘Comparative History, Cross-National History, Transnational History: Definitions’, in Cohen and O’Connor (eds.), Comparison and history. Europe in cross-national perspective (New York, 2004), ix–xxiv.

Iriye, Akira. ‘The Internationalization of History’, American Historical Review, 94, (1989), 1–10.

Judt, Tony. Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945. New York: Penguin Press, 2005.


[Ü] Istanbul as Tourist Destination in the Early Modern Period
Unterrichtssprachen Englisch und Deutsch
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
regelmäßiger Termin ab 16.04.2019
wöchentlich Di. 16:00 - 18:00 Uhr,  Phil. I, B 033

Kommentar:

In this class students will learn how to assess and extract information from historical sources by analyzing travellers accounts about different sites/sights of Ottoman Constantinople/Istanbul. We will read, analyze and compare accounts of Hans Dernschwamm, Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecq, Stephan Gerlach, Martin Gruneweg, Simeon of Poland, Paul of Aleppo, Evliya Çelebi and others. Following books are recommended for preparation:

Klaus Kreiser: Istanbul. Ein historischer Stadtführer. München, 2009.
Božidar Jezernik: Das wilde Europa. Der Balkan in den Augen westlicher Reisender. Wien, 2016, English: Wild Europe. The Balkans in the Gaze of Western Travellers. London, 2004.

Languages of instruction will be ENGLISH AND GERMAN. Sources available only in German will be consecutively mediated by the attending German-speaking students and the instructor.


[Ü] Oral history: methodology and practice
Unterrichtssprache ist englisch.
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
regelmäßiger Termin ab 16.04.2019
wöchentlich Di. 12:00 - 14:00 Uhr,  Phil. I, F 007

[Ü] Rethinking Courtesy: Historical Interpretations of medieval court society
Unterrichtssprache ist englisch
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
regelmäßiger Termin ab 16.04.2019
wöchentlich Di. 10:00 - 12:00 Uhr,  Phil. I, G 026

Kommentar:

This seminar discusses the diverse theories and methods applied to the study of medieval court life. From the 19th century on, historians developed widely different interpretations of the development of knighthood, chivalry and courtesy.

The topic was studied by other disciplines as well: Social sciences, anthropology, literary studies and gender theories influenced the image of the European medieval court. In this seminar, the methods and readings of influential thinkers (e.g. Jakob Burckhardt, Johan Huizinga and Norbert Elias) will be discussed alongside the interpretations of contemporary historians.

Scholars based their theories on medieval chronicles, romantic novels, prose, courtesy books and mirrors for princes, but presented quite different results and interpretations. Stating this, some methodological questions arise in discussing readings of medieval court life: Why can the outcome of research be so different in studying the same past? What biographical influence can be seen in the constructing of narratives and concepts? And: What are the hermeneutic possibilities and limits of using medieval sources?

Please notice: This is an English-speaking seminar. Students will be expected to use English as a common language during the sessions.


 
[Ü] Blockseminar zum "goEast Filmfestival des mittel- und osteuropäischen Films" (10. bis 16.04.2019) / Film-Workshop "goEast-Festival of Central- and Eastern European Film" (10. bis 16.04.2019)
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
2 Einzeltermine:
Mi. 10.04.2019,10.00 - 18.00 Uhr   Phil. I, G 025
Mi. 17.04.2019,12.00 - 18.00 Uhr   Alter Steinbacher Weg 44, 103

Zielgruppen:
MFKW Ma, WPV, 1.-4. Sem  |  SLK Ma, WPV, 1.-4. Sem  |  SLK Ba, WPV, 4./6. Sem  |  MFKW Ba, WPV, 4./6. Sem

Kommentar:

English follows German

+++ACHTUNG+++ Das Filmfestival und das dazugehörige Blockseminar finden bereits vor Semesterbeginn statt. Bitte melden Sie sich unverzüglich an und seien Sie bitte auch in den Semesterferien für die Planungen erreichbar!
GoEast, das Festival des Mittel- und Osteuropäischen Films findet jedes Jahr in der hessischen Landeshauptstadt Wiesbaden statt. Diese Gelegenheit wollen wir nutzen und das Filmfestival während eines Blockseminars besuchen (die Anreise ist mit dem Semesterticket möglich; den Festivalpass können Sie zum ermäßigten Preis von 25€ erwerben). Das Festival findet dieses Jahr vom 10.-16. April 2019 statt und damit bereits VOR SEMESTERBEGINN. Vor Festivalbeginn findet eine verpflichtende Vorbesprechung sowie eine Einführung in die Filmanalyse und -kritik statt (10. April 2019, 10–18 Uhr), nach dem Festivalbesuch eine Nachbesprechung zur Diskussion der gesehenen Filme (17. April 2019, 12–18 Uhr). Sie besuchen das Filmfestival in Wiesbaden und sehen dort Filme, die zum Teil von der Seminarleitung festgelegt werden, zum Teil nach persönlicher Vorliebe ausgesucht werden können.
Programm: Sonntag in Wiesbaden (11:00 Uhr Kanun, 14:00 Uhr Short Films, 18:30 Uhr Äther, 20:30 Uhr Discussion with Zanussi) und Dienstag im Kinocenter Gießen (20:00 Uhr Müll auf dem Mars).
Als Leistungsnachweis erstellen Sie ein Portfolio. Darin sammeln Sie Informationen über das Festivalprogramm, Material und Notizen zu ausgewählten Filmen sowie zwei bis drei von Ihnen erstellte ausführliche Filmkritiken. Das Seminar soll Sie dazu befähigen, Ihre Dokumentationstechniken zu verbessern und Sie mit der Gattung Filmkritik vertraut machen. Darüber hinaus erhalten Sie in nur wenigen Tagen einen Überblick über die aktuelle osteuropäische Filmszene, wobei Sie durchaus auch individuellen Interessen nachgehen können. Studierende der Slavistik können sich ab dem 4. Februar auf der Website des Festivals akkreditieren und erhalten dadurch einen ermäßigten Festivalpass. Dazu müssen Sie ein Profil anlegen und die Akkreditierung beantragen. Sie müssen dazu auch Ihre Immatrikulationsbescheinigung hochladen. Bitte informieren Sie sich bereits im Vorfeld auf der Website des Festivals (http://www.filmfestival-goeast.de/de/), damit wir die Filmauswahl nach Ihren Wünschen gestalten können.

+++ATTENTION+++ The Film festival, as well as the associated Seminar will start before the official start of the Summer Semester. In that regard, we kindly ask you to sign up promptly and be available during the semester break.
Every year in April, Wiesbaden becomes one of the most important international venues for Central and Eastern European cinema, by hosting the “goEast-Festival of Central- and Eastern European Film”. This year, more than a hundred carefully selected movies will be screened from 10th to 16th of April.
With this Seminar, we would like to encourage students to use the opportunity and visit the Festival (the trip is covered with the semester ticket and the festival pass is provided at a reduced price of 25€ for students of Slavic Studies).
Before the Festival begins, there will be a compulsory preliminary session as well as an introduction to the film analysis and criticism. (10 April 2019, 10am – 6pm). After the Festival (17 April 2019, 12pm – 18pm), we will meet for the discussion of the seen films. The participants are expected to create a portfolio, which consists of the information about the Festival’s program, notes on selected films, and two or three comprehensive movie reviews you will eventually produce. This Seminar aims to familiarize you with the tools for film interpretation and film criticism; and improve your documentary methods as researchers. In addition, you will get an overview of the current Eastern European cultural scene in just a few days. The films will be chosen partly by the seminar leaders and partly by the students. Please visit the festival’s website for information about the program and about the accreditation: http://www.filmfestival-goeast.de/de/


[Si] Law and Literature
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
regelmäßiger Termin ab 17.06.2019
wöchentlich Mo. 16:00 - 20:00 Uhr,  Phil I, B 409 (vierstündig)

Zielgruppen:
MFKW Ma, PV/WPV, Sj 1/2  |  MLL Ma, PV/WPV, Sj 1  |  NFF Ma, PV/WPV, Sj 1  |  SLK Ma, PV/WPV, Sj 1/2  |  GuK Ma, PV/WPV, Sj 1/2  |  Komp Ma, PV/WPV, Sj 1  |  ATW Ma, WPV, 1.-4. Sem.  |  L 3, PV/WPV, Sj 4

Kommentar:

What is justice? What is morality? What is law? What is truth?
We spend our lives within a legal system, a framework of rules, regulations, and norms that shapes interactions between and among people and nations. We also organize our lives through narrative—fictive or real—using stories to shape both our actual experiences and our understanding of them. Both the legal system and literary expression are primarily experienced through language. In the case of law, language frames legal expression, but is also the primary tool through which law’s authority is enforced. Literary texts, similarly, are framed through language, and can even challenge the legal system by exploring boundaries of convention—banned books are both literary and legal artifacts.
This course surveys the broad field of law and literature, largely through Anglo-American common law, then closely explores several specific texts that present problems in jurisprudence and moral philosophy common to legal systems.
Required reading will include some short stories and selections from:
Aeschylus. The Oresteia.
Melville, Herman. “Bartleby the Scrivener,” and “Billy Budd, Foretopman.”
Shakespeare, William. The Merchant of Venice.
Wacks, Raymond. Law: A Very Short Introduction. 2E. NY: Oxford, 2016.

We will also screen all or part of the following films:

Rashomon (1950, dir. Akira Kurosawa, 88 minutes)
The Trial (1962, dir. Orson Welles, 118 minutes)
12 Angry Men (1957, dir. Sidney Lumet, 96 minutes)

This seminar requires a high degree of in-class interaction, weekly short writing, and a final paper. No familiarity with legal writing or analysis is necessary.


[Si] Utopian Spaces in Modern Science Fiction
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
regelmäßiger Termin ab 12.06.2019
wöchentlich Mi. 16:00 - 20:00 Uhr,  Phil I, B410 (4-stündig)

Zielgruppen:
MFKW Ma, PV/WPV, Sj 1/2  |  MLL Ma, PV/WPV, Sj 1  |  NFF Ma, PV/WPV, Sj 1  |  SLK Ma, PV/WPV, Sj 1/2  |  GuK Ma, PV/WPV, Sj 1/2  |  Komp Ma, PV/WPV, Sj 1  |  ATW Ma, WPV, 1.-4. Sem.  |  L 3, PV/WPV, Sj 4

Kommentar:

This course addresses the definitional questions and political status of utopianism and science fiction via readings of critical and theoretical work alongside readings and viewings of recent fiction and film. We will address definitional questions: what is science fiction? Utopian fiction? Does one subsume the other?; genre questions: is X literature? Why or why not?; and interpretive methods suitable for genre fiction and film. In moving through these questions, the course is primarily concerned with the status of utopian hope versus dystopian despair in two English-language science fiction texts addressing postapocalyptic hope or alternative visions of world politics and futures.

Primary texts include some short fiction and:

Hamid, Mohsin. Exit West.
Mandel, Emily St. John. Station Eleven.

We will screen the following digital shorts as well:

Pumzi (2010, dir. Wanuri Kahiu)
That Which Once Was (2011, dir. Kimi Takesue)

And one or more of the following full-length films:

Metropolis (1927, dir. Fritz Lang)
Sleep Dealer (2008, dir. Alex Rivera)
The Wall (Die Wand) (2012, dir. Julian Pölsler)
Zardoz (1974, dir. John Boorman)

This seminar requires a high degree of in-class interaction, weekly short writing, and a final paper.


 
[Si] Exercise Psychology E - in englischer Sprache  (BG-BA-09)
Dozent/-in:
Zeit und Ort:
regelmäßiger Termin ab 18.04.2019
wöchentlich Do. 14:00 - 16:00 Uhr,  Kugelberg 62, Multifunktionsgebäude, 01 (Seminarraum)

Zielgruppe:
BuG BSc, PV, 2. Sem

Kommentar:

Das Seminar “Exercise Psychology” befasst sich mit den psychologischen Aspekten von körperlicher Bewegung. Die Seminarthemen konzentrieren sich dabei auf menschliches Fühlen, Denken und Handeln im Kontext von Gesundheitsverhalten. Im Laufe des Seminars entwickeln die Studierenden ein Verständnis für die Wirkung von Bewegung auf psychische Gesundheit und Wohlbefinden, sowie für Einflussfaktoren, die einen körperlich aktiven eigene fördern bzw. Ihm im Wege stehen. Literaturgrundlage:Hausenblas, H. A., & Rhodes, R. (2017). Exercise Psychology: Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior. Jones & Bartlett Learning, LLC.


           
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